Finding Solace

It is a rare treat in my day that I manage to find five minutes to think about anything which isn’t work. Finding that minute of solace in a hectic and managing to appreciate it is almost unheard of in my office.

We all run fast, we sprint from decision to decision, certain that the profit and the bottom line will be hugely negatively affected if we pause to breathe for a second.

Most of the time we’re right, most of the time the decision needed to be made an hour ago, yet we’re only just hearing of the issue. Most of the time is not that moment of solace, so when it comes we need to truly embrace it.
As I was sat on the train heading home the other day, I had one of those rare moments. My inbox was answered, my phone was silent and I was heading home for the weekend. My work life was perfectly paused for the first time in a long time. Yet, in what should have been the best moment of the week, quickly became a concern.

I was sat on a train, not able to do anything. I had no where to be and nothing to do. What should I have been doing in that moment? I’d always wanted to learn a language, but these five short minutes was not going to be long enough to even decide which language to start.

Instead I idly found myself on my phone and searching United Kingdom online casinos. I wanted to play with numbers in my spare time. I wanted to find a challenge and to still be able to use my knowledge of permutations and combinations. I wanted to play at something which my day job only came close to.

Having spent a couple of minutes looking around at the best the UK had to offer, my mind jumped straight to Las Vegas, to the heady highs and the soul crunching lows of the lights in the desert. With less than a cognitive thought, my fingers had already started to type best casinos in USA.

To say that I was presented with a completely different offering, would be a huge understatement. The difference between the styles was almost too stereo-typical to be true. The UK sites had clearly focused on game play, on linking a game to celebrity or a sport. Whereas their American counterparts were more aligned to bright lights, flashing colours and too many buttons to click.

It was everything we used to think about our American cousins in the Eighties. Yet, here it was in living colour and still trying to take my money.

The brief break in my day was coming to a close, my station was next and I was still transfixed by the worked random patterns flashing across my screen. I was so convinced that I had already spotted the pattern that I was reaching for my wallet to put some money in.

I’m guessing that the next time I’m on a train, I’ll be taking the bankers for all their worth.

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